Tuesday, 07 April 2020
News with tag Soldiers  RSS
Gunmen kill 25 soldiers in north Mali attack: army spokesman

Added: 06.04.2020 19:16 | 10 views | 0 comments

Unidentified gunmen killed 25 soldiers and wounded six others in an attack in the Gao region of northern Mali on Monday morning, army spokesman Diarran Koné told Reuters.

Tags: EU, Army, Soldiers
From: feeds.reuters.com

Israel seals off ultra-Orthodox town hit hard by coronavirus

Added: 03.04.2020 16:16 | 11 views | 0 comments

Israel threw up roadblocks on Friday to seal off an ultra-Orthodox Jewish town badly affected by the coronavirus, but ordered in soldiers to support the residents.

From: feeds.reuters.com

Army soldiers set up military hospital in Seattle

Added: 02.04.2020 22:10 | 10 views | 0 comments

Army soldiers are setting up a military hospital at Seattle's CenturyLink Field and it will include 250 beds for non-coronavirus patients. (April 2)

From: rssfeeds.usatoday.com

French army reports four soldiers positive for coronavirus in West Africa

Added: 02.04.2020 17:16 | 10 views | 0 comments

Four soldiers in West Africa have tested positive for coronavirus, French army said on Thursday.

From: feeds.reuters.com

The Paris Orphan Discussion Questions

Added: 01.04.2020 21:45 | 5 views | 0 comments


  1. One of the author’s concerns when writing the book was that the extent and magnitude of the bias and discrimination shown towards female war correspondents was so great that readers might not believe it could really have happened. Were you shocked by the any of the sexist behaviour, rules or beliefs described in the incidents in the book? Which incidents surprised you the most? How do you think it might affect a woman to have to struggle against such ingrained bias in order to do her job?
    1. Had you heard of Lee Miller before you read the book? Have you been drawn to find out any more about Miller since reading it? What do you think of the author’s decision to create a character inspired by Miller rather than write a fictionalised account of Lee Miller’s life? Which approach do you think you might prefer as a reader?
      1. Victorine makes a difficult decision towards the end of the novel when she withholds information from both Jess and Dan. What did you think of her decision? What might you have done in her place? Is it possible to make the wrong decision for the right reasons? How important is it to consider a person’s motivations when assessing whether their decision was right or wrong?
        1. Both Jess and Dan make different decisions when it comes to Amelia’s ultimatum: Dan decides to marry Jess in spite of his battalion; Jess decides to leave Dan so that he has to marry Amelia. Who was the more heroic out of Jess and Dan over the course of the war, and in making that final decision? Which one of them made the “right” decision?
          1. For much of the novel, Jess collects information about soldiers sexually assaulting civilian women. She doesn’t report on this until after the war. Do you think it was cowardly of her to wait so long? What do you think might have happened had she tried to publish the article while the war was still continuing? Was she guilty of letting other women down, or did she have no choice?
            1. Back in London, Jess has the thought: "War makes us monsters or angels, but so too does love.” How difficult do you think it would be to fall in love during wartime, knowing that death was a very real possibility for one or both partners? Do you think this would change the kind of love a person might feel, make it tense perhaps because risk is everywhere, or less intense because the fear of death creates a fear of true intimacy? How can love make someone a monster and where does this happen in the book?
              1. The difficulties Jess and Dan and Amelia face during the war are very different to the difficulties D’Arcy and Josh have faced in their lives. Do you think people in contemporary times are guilty of creating problems where none exist? To what extent does living through a war change how a person views life? Are contemporary concerns less important than those people faced during the 1940s or are both sets of issues equally challenging and worthy of discussion?
                1. There are many women in the book who are based on real people including Martha Gellhorn, Lee Carson, Iris Carpenter, and Catherine Coyne. Had you heard of any of these women before reading the book? Which ones? Is it true that the stories of so many extraordinary women have been lost to history, and forgotten by those of us who come after? If so, why do you think that is? What other books have you read, or movies have you watched, that feature extraordinary women from history and what did you enjoy about them?

From: www.moon.com

From Chateaux to Battlefields: Walking the Paths My Characters Tread

Added: 01.04.2020 21:45 | 2 views | 0 comments


Next to writing, research is my true love. When I stand in the spaces I want my characters to inhabit, I can feel them and see them and bring their lives and their stories out of my imagination and into the structure of words and sentences.

The Hotel Scribe, Paris

To research The Paris Orphan, I started in Paris at the Hotel Scribe, where Lee Miller stayed during World War II and where Jessica May, my character, also stays. The hotel was used by the U.S. Army as the press office, and the hotel’s exterior is largely unchanged from that time.

Staying in the hotel for several nights allowed me to picture more vividly the scenes in my story set there, to see where Miller’s room was, and the view from her balcony. The hotel is very proud of its association with Miller.

A Chateau in the Champagne Region

From there I had the very difficult(!) job of staying in a chateau just outside Reims in France’s Champagne region, just as D’Arcy does in The Paris Orphan. How I suffer for my art!

It was a wonderful experience because I was able to wallow in the richness and lushness of the area. The extraordinarily bright pumpkins that D’Arcy sees from her window are the pumpkins I saw from my room at the chateau, as is the canal, the maze, the plane trees, the potager—or vegetable garden—and the butterflies. From inside the chateau, the black-and-white-tiled marble floor, the salon de grisailles, the boiserie, and the turret all came from the chateau I stayed at.

Crazy Trees—Les Faux de Verzy

I had heard about Les Faux de Verzy, the dwarf twisted beech trees that feature in The Paris Orphan, before I left for France. I was determined to see them, as they captured my imagination. When I told my kids we were going to spend the afternoon walking through a forest in search of crazy trees, they looked at me as if I was the one who was crazy!

But we had the perfect day. It was a little overcast and dark, haunting, mystical, magical even. We found the trees, and they were like something from myth. We all felt as if we were walking through an enchanted forest. As we left, my kids said to me that doing weird research things with Mummy always ended up being really fun! There was no way I could leave those spectacular trees out of the book.

On to Normandy

I then traveled to Normandy, which was a sobering experience. Standing on Omaha Beach, as Jess does in the book, deeply affected me. The beach is so very wide, and I could see the difficulty that any soldier would have had, jumping out of a vessel on the water, traversing through waves to the ocean’s edge, and then having to forge a way across that vast stretch of sand to safety. Almost impossible. I could feel how Jess might feel, standing there, seventy-odd years ago, a witness to the immense and terrible destruction of human life.

I visited the American Cemetery there, and then drove to Sainte-Mère Église, where there is a museum dedicated to the paratroopers. I knew little about the intricacies of battles and battalions, so seeing a mannequin dressed in a paratrooper’s uniform, plus all of the eighty kilograms of equipment they carried, and studying the maps of their campaigns and victories was hugely helpful in allowing me to better understand Dan Hallworth and what he might have faced.

In the museums of Normandy, I saw a lot of the equipment used by the soldiers and the personal items carried by them, which helped me to recreate life as it could have been: everything from U.S. Army jeeps and tanks, to long-tom guns, packs of Lucky Strikes, ration chocolate, Scott paper, and tins of Marathon foot powder—all of which appear in the book.

I was also able to see the accreditation papers, passport, uniforms, telegrams, diary, and war correspondent badge of Virginia Irwin, one of the female correspondents, at the Imperial War Museum at Duxford, England. These were all items Jess would have required, so it was wonderful to view them.

And then it was time to leave Europe and to try to write down the story that was occupying all of my thoughts. It’s my favorite of all of my books. I truly hope you enjoy reading The Paris Orphan as much as I enjoyed writing it. Thank you.

For photographs and more, visit my blog on natashalester.com.au.

Nazi concentration camp Sylt on island of Alderney revealed by archaeologists

Added: 01.04.2020 20:11 | 10 views | 0 comments

For for the first time since its destruction at the conclustion of World War II, a concentration camp on the island of Alderney has been studied by archaeologists -- revealing new information about the site where Nazi soldiers committed atrocities against prisoners.

From: https:

Military building 250-bed field hospital in Seattle, other makeshift centers expected in Washington

Added: 01.04.2020 16:30 | 7 views | 0 comments

U.S. Army soldiers have been deployed to build a 250-bed, fully functioning field hospital inside a Seattle convention center to relieve the pressure on local hospitals buckling from an influx of coronavirus patients.

From: feeds.foxnews.com

Italian doctor rages at 'unprepared' coronavirus workers sent in 'like soldiers to war'

Added: 01.04.2020 11:37 | 22 views | 0 comments

AN ITALIAN doctor has furiously hit out at his Government's coronavirus strategy for failing to prepare and protect healthcare workers as the number of doctors passing away from the virus has reached 66 in the country.

From: feedproxy.google.com

On César Chávez Day, Biden calls for coronavirus protections for farm workers

Added: 31.03.2020 22:46 | 27 views | 0 comments

"Farmworkers are soldiers in this war against an invisible and undiscriminating enemy," Biden says.

From: https:

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