Tuesday, 18 June 2019
News with tag USA  RSS
Meet Nikki and Brie Bella in Los Angeles for USA TODAY's Wine & Food Experience tour

Added: 18.06.2019 21:17 | 7 views | 0 comments

USA TODAY's Wine & Food Experience will hit Los Angeles in November, and fans have a chance to meet the Bella twins.

From: rssfeeds.usatoday.com

Russia, China delay U.S. push for halt to North Korea fuel imports

Added: 18.06.2019 21:16 | 9 views | 0 comments

Russia and China on Tuesday delayed a U.S. request for a U.N. Security Council sanctions committee to demand an immediate halt to deliveries of refined petroleum to North Korea over accusations Pyongyang violated a U.N. cap, diplomats said.

From: feeds.reuters.com

Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan withdraws nomination amid domestic violence claims

Added: 18.06.2019 20:48 | 3 views | 0 comments

Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan is withdrawing from the confirmation process after accusations of domestic violence by his ex-wife. Secretary of the Army Mark Esper will be taking his place. This comes as the Pentagon also announced it will be sending 1,000 more troops to the Middle East. CBS News national security correspondent David Martin joined CBSN with more.

From: feeds.cbsnews.com

Pictures: People camp out to attend President Trump's 2020 campaign rally

Added: 18.06.2019 20:39 | 7 views | 0 comments

Thousands of Trump supporters cheerfully waited for hours or days in sweltering temperatures to see the president launch his new campaign.

From: https:

Tips for Kids in National Parks

Added: 18.06.2019 19:38 | 2 views | 0 comments


Family hikingGetting kids interested in national parks can be a challenge—and so is keeping them entertained once you get there! Here are a few tips for helping your family make the most of its time in the great outdoors: 1. Can’t get your kids off their phones? Encourage them to take photos for a family album that focuses on the variety of detail on trails. Put each child in charge of a certain thing: plants, rocks, tree bark, animals, water, etc. 2. Get your younger kids involved in Junior Ranger programs! Some parks have programs for older kids, too. 3. Prepare kids for the elements with appropriate layers of clothing, footwear, mittens, and hats. Don’t forget sunscreen and bug spray, too! 4. Check your park’s specific NPS site before you leave home—you’ll find special kid-friendly programs and activities under “kids.” 5. Play trail games like “I Spy” to keep kids engaged along the way. 6. Choose shorter trails for young kids with attractions as destinations: lakes, boulders to play on, driftwood on beaches. 7. Check out the program: 4th graders can visit all national parks for free! 8. Prevent meltdowns by having snacks and water handy, even on short hikes or adventures. For more tips for exploring the national parks with your family, pick up: [hbg-title isbn="9781640492790" summary="They’ve been dubbed America’s best idea for a reason: get inspired, get outdoors, and discover the wild beauty of the United States with Moon USA National Parks."] [hbg-post heading="What to read next:" id="684728,672906,669869" /] Pin it for Later national parks with kids pinterest graphic

From: www.avalontravelbooks.com

Leave No Trace: 6 Tips for Visiting the National Parks

Added: 18.06.2019 19:38 | 2 views | 0 comments


Man hiking in mountainsThe national parks are some of our country's greatest national treasures—so it's important that while we enjoy them, we also take care of them, especially when hiking and camping in backcountry areas. To help keep the parks pristine, visitors need to take an active role in maintaining them. Here's how you can make the most of the national parks and make sure you leave no trace: Plan Ahead and Prepare Hiking in the backcountry is inherently risky. Three miles of hiking at the high elevations in Wyoming may be much harder than three miles in your neighborhood park back home. Choose appropriate routes for mileage and elevation gain with this in mind, and carry hiking essentials. Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces In front-country and backcountry campgrounds, camp in designated sites. Protect fragile plants by staying on trails even in mud, refusing to cut switchbacks, and walking single file. If you must walk off the trail, step on rocks, snow, or dry grasses rather than wet soil and delicate plants. Leave What You Find Flowers, rocks, and fur tufts on shrubs are protected park resources, as are historical and cultural items. For lunch stops and camping, sit on rocks or logs where you find them rather than moving them to accommodate comfort. Minimize Campfire Impacts Make fires in designated fire pits only, not on beaches. Use small wrist-sized dead and downed wood, not live branches. Be aware: Fires and collecting firewood are not permitted in some places in the parks. Respect Wildlife Bring along binoculars, spotting scopes, and telephoto lenses to aid in watching wildlife. Keep your distance. Do not feed any wildlife, even ground squirrels. Once fed, they can become more aggressive. Be Considerate of Other Visitors In particular, be aware of cell phones and how their use or noise cuts into the natural soundscapes of the parks. For formation on Leave No Trace, visit . Happy camping! Ready to plan your parks adventure? [hbg-title isbn="9781640492776" summary="They’ve been dubbed America’s best idea for a reason: get inspired, get outdoors, and discover the wild beauty of the United States with Moon USA National Parks."/] [hbg-newsletter call_to_action="Want travel inspiration sent straight to your inbox?" button_text="Sign up" list_id_override="c89b0f3998/] Pin it for Later leave no trace pinterest graphic

From: www.moon.com

HBG Big News This Week: April 8-12, 2019

Added: 18.06.2019 19:38 | 4 views | 0 comments


Following is a recap of major news at Hachette Book Group for the week of April 8-12, 2019: Bestseller news: Susan Page’s The Matriarch (Twelve) debuts this week at #3 on both the Print Hardcover Nonfiction and Combined P&E bestseller lists. Commander in Cheat by Rick Reilly (Hachette Books) debuts at #6 on the Print Hardcover Nonfiction and #7 on the Combined P&E bestsellers list. Katt vs. Dogg by James Patterson & Chris Grabenstein (JIMMY Patterson) makes its debut on the NYT Children’s bestseller (Middle Grade) list at #2. HBG’s distribution clients have three books on the New York Times list this week. Staffing news: Mary Ann Naples will join Hachette Books as Vice President & Publisher on April 22. Mary Ann was most recently VP & Publisher at the Disney Book Group, and prior to that she was SVP & Publisher of Rodale Books and Rodale Wellness. She has overseen the publication of an impressive roster of best-selling authors and franchises, and has also been an entrepreneur, working in digital start-ups and as a literary agent.  Read more about our new colleague here: , . New HUK warehouse: on Tuesday, the Hely Hutchinson Centre was officially opened by Tim Hely Hutchinson, CEO of Hachette UK until his retirement in 2017. All the publishers within the Hachette UK group and the third-party publishers distributed by Hachette will be distributed from the site by the end of the second quarter of 2019. The Centre is 242,000 square feet, will dispatch 65 million books, and has 150,000 titles in stock. It’s the most advanced of its kind in Europe.

From: www.moon.com

7 New England Breweries to Pair with a Hike

Added: 18.06.2019 18:47 | 1 views | 0 comments


brewery building with a wooden sign and a trailer in frontGorgeous scenery and craft brewing are two of the things New England does best. So why not combine them for the perfect New England day? From the mountains of New Hampshire to the shores of Maine, here are 7 #brewhikes to try. 1. North Western Massachusetts – North Adams Outdoorsy options are plentiful in this part of Western Mass. But if you’re up for a challenge, there’s no better hike than to the top of , the highest point in Massachusetts. Enjoy any one of the 70 trails within the reservation, like the challenging 9.6-mile loop to the peak that traces Henry David Thoreau’s 1844 hike, or a slightly more low-key 6.2-mile round-trip summit hike that takes about 4-5 hours from the Mount Greylock Campground. Once you’re at the top, take a moment to catch your breath and take in views that stretch to Vermont and New York. By this point you’ll be craving a cold one, and you’ll be in luck—because from the end of the trail it’s about a half-hour drive to . The space is a nod to North Adams’s industrial past, with gorgeous brick walls and a 40-foot bar made by local workers. Its diverse lineup of beers manages to bridge the divide between visiting art lovers (mind-bending contemporary art is right next door at Mass MoCA!) and the local crowd. Plus, there’s pizza. 2. South Western Massachusetts – Great Barrington If you find yourself in the southern stretch of the Berkshires, get a taste of the Appalachian Trail in , which has miles of hiking and multiuse trails. Walking on the Appalachian is generally an out-and-back that can be as long or as short as you like, but the forest’s most popular option is the gorgeous Benedict Pond Loop Trail, an easy hike that wraps 1.5 miles around a tree-fringed lake. After, swing by for their serious list of beers, plus a sprawling menu of sandwiches, salads, burgers, and more. Head straight through the dining room for the bar, where regulars’ mugs hang overhead and every possible surface is covered in coasters from breweries around the world. The tap list changes with the season, but the Black Bear Stout and Barrington Brown are local favorites. 3. Central Vermont – Woodstock & Vicinity Seven miles east of Woodstock, Quechee Gorge Trail is a pleasant 2.2-mile round-trip hike that starts at the visitors center and leads into Vermont’s deepest gorge, which was carved by retreating glaciers. On a hot day, it’s a lovely place to take a dip in the water. Follow up this short trail with a can from , which is about a half an hour drive away. Long Trail started filling kegs in 1989, and its flagship amber ale is now ubiquitous in Vermont. If that’s the only Long Trail brew you’ve tried, you’ll be astounded by the selection at the brewery, which keeps around 13 beers on tap. Standouts include the barrel-aged Triple Bag, but the bartenders are through-and-through beer geeks who can guide your selection. The brewery also has a menu of pub food featuring wings, burgers, and other beer-friendly meals. A raised walkway overlooks the bottling and brewing facility, giving you a fascinating bird’s-eye view of the action. 4. Northwest Vermont – Stowe Though it has a reputation for being a ski town, there’s plenty of hiking (and drinking!) options in Stowe. One of the best is the steep, 1.1-mile hike from Smuggler’s Notch Road to , a scenic body of water that dazzles in autumn. Once there, take the additional 1.4-mile loop around the pond, and then head back into town to treat yourself. Stowe is blessed with a wealth of locally-made craft beers, starting with the Austrian lagers at . Favorites include the malty Vienna Style Lager and the Helles Lager, and the Bierhall’s menu of Austrian pub food—think cheddar and beer soup, hot soft pretzels, and many kinds of sausages—are perfect pairings for the entire lineup. In contrast, the beers at are defined by their distinctiveness. The brewer is consistently creative, with seasonal specials along with a list of mainstays: Try the Pink ‘n’ Pale, an American pale ale brewed with a hint of bitter grapefruit. 5. Northwest Vermont – Burlington Just south of Burlington in Charlotte you’ll find , whose namesake low-lying peak offers incredible views of Lake Champlain, the Adirondacks, and more. Starting at the parking lot, the 1.9-mile Mount Philo Trail loops up to the summit. It’s a relatively easy, family-friendly hike with a huge payoff at the top. Back in Burlington, you’re not likely to run out of craft beer options—after all, Vermont has more breweries per capita than any other state! If all the choices make you think you’d like a tour guide (and chauffeur), you can hop on the bus with , which will take you to all the hotspots. has something for most beer lovers, starting with the flagship Conehead, a single hop wheat IPA that’s brewed with Citra hops and is aromatic and hoppy without being overpowering. Another favorite is the London Calling, an English ordinary bitter that’s malty and mellow—and not particularly bitter. makes European-style beers in a nondescript industrial building. The tasting room has more charm and is lined with old beer cans and historical images of Burlington. Try the hugely popular Yorkshire Porter, an English dark ale that’s rich and full bodied, or Argument, an English India pale ale that’s brewed true to style: strong and bitter. , a relatively recent addition to Burlington’s beer scene, has hoppy, aromatic beers made by passionate beer geeks. 6. Northwest New Hampshire – White Mountains & Franconia Range For the ultimate hike in the Franconia Range, plan for at least six hours on the , a rugged trail that goes up and over three peaks: Little Haystack Mountain, Mount Lincoln, and Mount Lafayette. You’ll climb 3,480 feet in about four miles, passing waterfalls, knife-edge ridges, and other scenic views. (Pro tip: for a slightly more moderate hike, try the instead.) Afterwards, it’s about a 15-minute drive north to the , which brews small-barrel batches of European-style beers that range from more familiar Hefeweizens to offbeat pours, like a sour brown wild ale, Leipzig-style gose, and Czech black lagers. If you’re feeling famished after the trek, take a seat in the historic riverside barn or kick back on the patio with one of their Neapolitan-style pizzas. 7. Southern Maine – Portland If urban “hikes” are more your thing, check out in Portland. Back Cove is a 3.6-mile paved trail that circles a small estuary just north of downtown. If you’re headed from north to south, the trail connects to the Eastern Promenade, a slender waterfront park that 2.1 miles end-to-end, with walking trails, a popular swimming beach, and jaw-dropping sunrise views. Check out for more maps and directions to some of the city’s best offerings. Afterwards, explore the cutting edge of American beer with a cluster of breweries that are walking distance from downtown. (The is also an option.) Don’t miss , which has a diverse list of beers on tap, including the flagship Daymark American Pale Ale, a gorgeously balanced brew made with locally grown rye. Devoted beer geeks should head next door to , which uses many local ingredients in its offerings, including whiskey, rum, gin, and the unusual Black Cap Barley Spirit, made entirely with Maine-grown barley and filtered through Maine maple charcoal. started in Kennebunkport, but the heart of Maine’s largest brewery is just on the edge of downtown Portland. The tasting room has a brewpub feel, with barrels of aging beers stacked high against the walls, and a huge selection of brews on draft. Finally, stop for a tasting at , which turns out beers beloved across New England, like the refreshing Allagash White and a rich-tasting tripel that packs a malty wallop.

Find more trails and ales to inspire your next #brewhike:

[hbg-title isbn="9781640491748" summary="Explore the best of New England’s historic cities, admire the famed fall foliage, and stroll the stunning coastline with Moon Travel Guides."/] Pin it for Later new england breweries and hikes pinterest graphic

Visiting Machu Picchu: 4 Tips for Responsible Travel

Added: 18.06.2019 18:42 | 1 views | 0 comments


indigenous woman weavingPeru's tourism has seen a massive boom in recent years. More than 3,000 tourists per day trample the grounds of the ancient Inca city, well above the limit set by UNESCO. Such popularity comes at a price: Because Machu Picchu is built on a humanmade mound of earth, the ground is comparatively soft and the site is actually sinking, albeit very slowly. Due to the influx of tourists, Peru is implementing new measures to visit Machu Picchu in order to ensure sustainability, including establishing two entry windows (6am-noon and noon-5:30pm), predetermined paths for tourists to walk on while in the sanctuary, and time limits at specific spots in the ruins. If you’re headed to Machu Picchu, there are plenty of ways for you to minimize your environmental impact while making the most of your trip of a lifetime! Here's where to start. Pass on Plastic Every time travelers buy a plastic water bottle, they are contributing to a waste problem that is reaching epic proportions all over Peru. Nearly 200 million plastic bottles are produced every month in Peru alone, and a good chunk of these are consumed by tourists—who understandably need a few liters of purified water for each day in Peru. Here's what you can do to help:
  • Carry a reusable hard plastic water bottle and fill it with treated or boiled water.
  • Buy sodas and water in refillable glass bottles.
  • Request that your hotel provide water tanks (bidones) or at the very least boiled water for refilling bottles.
  • Reuse plastic bags over and over and do not accept new ones.
  • Spread the word!
Pick a Responsible Trekking Agency Among the more than 150 licensed trekking agencies operating in Cusco, the standards of service and social and environmental responsibilities vary greatly. It's important to be discerning and to research thoroughly before booking. , , and are a few great choices: Not only is their experience and professionalism unsurpassed, but they consistently recycle their trash, pack out all human waste, treat water carefully, and pay porters fair wages. Shop Local From beautiful crafts and Andean paintings to gorgeous ceramics and weavings, there are tons of souvenir options to bring home from your adventure, and they can be a great way to support the local economy. A great association in Cusco, run by the altruistic Franco Negri, is Casa Ecológica (Portal de Carnes 236, interior 2, cell tel. 984-117-962, 9am-9:30pm daily), which was created to promote sustainable development in rural communities. The shop sells traditional crafts produced with natural fibers, as well as organic cosmetics and food products. You'll find some of the highest-quality textiles for sale in all of Cusco at the (Av. El Sol 603, tel. 084/22-8117, 7:30am-8:30pm daily). Nilda Callañaupa, a weaver and scholar from Chinchero, set up the center with the admirable goal of recovering ancient technologies, showcasing high-quality weavings, and sending revenue straight back to the remote, neglected villages that produce them. Local weavers give daily demonstrations, and there are displays that explain all the plants, minerals, and berries used for natural dyes. Volunteer! Why not give back to the community while you're there? There are hundreds of volunteer opportunities in Peru involving art and culture, community development, disability and addiction services, ecotourism and the environment, education, health care, and services for children and women. Although these organizations don't pay salaries, they often provide food or accommodation in exchange for your time. The nonprofit (Lima tel. 01/447-5190) is dedicated to conserving natural biodiversity, and its volunteers play a firsthand role in helping that mission happen. The two-week to monthlong volunteer programs take participants to the ocean to research dolphin populations or dive into open water to collect marine species. (Only experienced divers can apply for the latter option.) A rainforest trip to Manu involves researching tapirs, macaws, and giant river otters. Lima's is a solid resource that hooks up volunteers with organizations. There are also many Peru-based volunteer organizations: check out programs in Huancayo; the organization in Carhuaz in the Cordillera Blanca; and in Ollantaytambo. Related Travel Guide [hbg-title isbn="9781640493162" summary="Mystical, timeless, and full of adventure: embark on the trip of a lifetime to the jewel of Peru with Moon Travel Guides." /] Pin it for Later machu picchu responsible travel pinterest graphic

From: www.moon.com

Community Tourism on Floreana Island

Added: 18.06.2019 18:42 | 2 views | 0 comments


trail through red flora that leads to green floraFloreana has been a day tour destination from Santa Cruz for years. The residents of Floreana call it “lightning tourism” because big tour groups “strike” the island for an instant and then are gone. While visitors may eat lunch at a restaurant in town, the residents see little of the profits. Floreana residents don’t want the large-scale development and numbers of tourists that visit the other ports. Puerto Ayora may not seem hectic to you, but if you compare its throngs of souvenir shops, luxury hotels, spas, and touts to Floreana’s sleepy dirt roads and population of 130, it might as well be New York City. The challenge has been to maintain the uniqueness of Floreana’s slow pace of life while creating economic opportunities for the locals. To that end, Floreana has worked with the national park and several conservation organizations to develop an entirely different model of tourism. The goal is to serve a limited number of tourists and ensure that the profits flow equitably into the community. Unlike Santa Cruz where multiple tour operators tout their services every time you walk down the street, Floreana has only one. The single community tourism operator (Centro Comunitario Floreana) directs the flow of group tours to hostels and restaurants and is the only company authorized to operate day tours to the beautiful Post Office Bay, Mirador de la Baronesa, and La Botella. As an independent traveler, consider yourself lucky; you can choose where to stay and eat. In contrast, when large tour groups arrive, people are assigned to stay in community-run guest houses and eat in community-run restaurants on a rotation schedule. A percentage of the proceeds goes back to CECFLOR for its operating costs, to support the local school and other projects to benefit the community. A key difference you may notice is that all of CECFLOR’s tours are run by local community guides. There are no naturalist guides living on Floreana, so the national park has authorized CECFLOR to send tourists to protected areas with locals instead. Unlike naturalist guides, community guides are locals who have other jobs outside of tourism; these tours are a source of extra income. Their English may be quite limited and they don’t have the training that naturalist guides go through, but they do know the sites well and can point out animal species to you. As an outsider, it may seem unfair that you aren’t allowed to walk on your own to Post Office Bay and Mirador de la Baronesa, but Floreana residents can go alone. Keep in mind, however, that many residents of Floreana are older; they lived on the island before the national park came into existence in 1959. For years the national park only allowed visits with a naturalist guide, but since no naturalist guides live on Floreana, it effectively prevented anyone from going unless they were on cruise ships. Under the new rules, residents can finally return to their favorite childhood haunts. Floreana's Community Tourism Guesthouses Floreana has seven mom-and-pop guesthouses that are affiliated with the community tourism project. These houses currently offer the same price of $35 per person, though there is a surprising variation in quality and amenities. The following list is ordered roughly in order of quality, best options first. Unless noted, these guesthouses do not include breakfast or air-conditioning. Note that there are plans to continue investing in renovating the guesthouses; prices may potentially increase. None of these guesthouses use online booking platforms; make your reservation through the direct emails provided below or through CECFLOR with a special request for the guesthouse of your choice. Casa Santa Maria (Ignacio Hernández, tel. 5/253-5022, malourdes.soria@hotmail.com, $35 pp), run by the seasoned owners of the Floreana Lava Lodge, boasts six relatively modern rooms with mini-fridge, safe-deposit box, and hot water; it’s a block inland. Ask for a room on the third floor. Casa de Emperatriz (12 de Febrero, tel. 5/253-5014, orquideasalgado@hotmail.com, $35 pp) has three rather dingy rooms a couple blocks inland by the main road, but it is the only budget option on the island with air-conditioning. Some rooms also have mini-fridges. Casa de Lelia (Ignacio Hernández and Oswaldo Rosero, tel. 5/253-5041, leliaflorimarc8@gmail.com, $35 pp), a block inland, has pleasant rooms with remodeled bathrooms, hammocks, and hot water; some rooms have mini-fridges. Los Cactus (Oswaldo and La Baronesa, tel. 5/253-5011, loscactus.gps@gmail.com, $35 pp), is slightly inland near the dock. There are four basic, modern-style guest rooms; the two on the second floor have limited views of the bay. There is a kitchen that guests are sometimes allowed to use, but it’s best to ask. Casa El Pajas (Wittmer at Zavala, tel. 5/253-5002, hospedaje.elpajas@gmail.com, $35 pp) has an attractive tiki-style log cabin vibe but is located a little farther inland than the other options. There is also a breezy second-floor sitting area and a couple hammocks. Cabañas Leocarpus (12 de Febrero, tel. 5/253-5054, veritoemi2006@gmail.com, $35 pp) on the main street has a similar rustic vibe. The guest rooms on the second floor have a very distant view to the sea. Each has one double bed and one single bed. Casa de Huéspedes Hildita (12 de Febrero and Juan Salgado, tel. 5/253-5079, $35 pp) has five guest rooms built around an empty gravel courtyard. Be aware, however, that while water is a precious resource on the entire island, this hostal has the strictest water usage policy. Related Travel Guide [hbg-title isbn="9781640492882" summary="The Galápagos archipelago is one of the most beautiful, wild, and untouched places on earth. Travel back in time with Moon Galápagos Islands."/] Pin it for Later floreana island tourism pinterest graphic

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