Wednesday, 19 June 2019
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Australian government boosts Senate numbers ahead of tax cut bill

Added: 19.06.2019 4:38 | 16 views | 0 comments

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison will need to secure just three votes in the country's upper house to pass legislation after election results on Wednesday showed his government picked up four additional Senate seats.

From: feeds.reuters.com

Pouring rain, food trucks and protests: The scene outside Trump’s reelection speech

Added: 19.06.2019 4:17 | 13 views | 0 comments

“Our patriotic movement has been under assault from the very first day,” Trump said after taking the stage at the 20,000-seat Amway Center in this state that was key to his 2016 victory.

From: https:

Humble Pizza Restaurant / Child Studio

Added: 19.06.2019 4:00 | 4 views | 0 comments


A new restaurant recently opened on London’s King’s Road, the neighbourhood synonymous with British fashion, music and pop culture movements of the 20th Century from mods and hippies to punks and New Romantics. Child Studio drew from these cultural references when creating the interior. The inspiration for the design came from the staple of British vernacular post-war architecture - the ‘Formica caffs’, which first appeared in London’s West End in the 1950s, several of them surviving intact to this day. Established by Italian immigrant families, those coffee bars served simple snacks and drinks in a pared-back modernist setting featuring laminate surfaces, pastel colours and cosy seating nooks and crannies. This was the beginning of the ‘cafe culture’ in London with King’s Road at the epicentre, attracting writers, musicians, photographers and bohemian characters of all styles.

From: feedproxy.google.com

Trump officially announces his reelection bid in Orlando

Added: 19.06.2019 2:00 | 15 views | 0 comments

“Our patriotic movement has been under assault from the very first day,” Trump said after taking the stage at the 20,000-seat Amway Center in this state that was key to his 2016 victory.

From: https:

Nissan considers seats for top two Renault executives in new committees: Nikkei

Added: 18.06.2019 23:16 | 18 views | 0 comments

Nissan Motor Co has plans to give multiple seats in its four proposed committees to alliance partner Renault SA's chief executive and chairman, Japan's Nikkei newspaper reported on Wednesday, citing sources.

Tags: Nissan, Japan, Seat, SPA
From: feeds.reuters.com

7 New England Breweries to Pair with a Hike

Added: 18.06.2019 18:47 | 4 views | 0 comments


brewery building with a wooden sign and a trailer in frontGorgeous scenery and craft brewing are two of the things New England does best. So why not combine them for the perfect New England day? From the mountains of New Hampshire to the shores of Maine, here are 7 #brewhikes to try. 1. North Western Massachusetts – North Adams Outdoorsy options are plentiful in this part of Western Mass. But if you’re up for a challenge, there’s no better hike than to the top of , the highest point in Massachusetts. Enjoy any one of the 70 trails within the reservation, like the challenging 9.6-mile loop to the peak that traces Henry David Thoreau’s 1844 hike, or a slightly more low-key 6.2-mile round-trip summit hike that takes about 4-5 hours from the Mount Greylock Campground. Once you’re at the top, take a moment to catch your breath and take in views that stretch to Vermont and New York. By this point you’ll be craving a cold one, and you’ll be in luck—because from the end of the trail it’s about a half-hour drive to . The space is a nod to North Adams’s industrial past, with gorgeous brick walls and a 40-foot bar made by local workers. Its diverse lineup of beers manages to bridge the divide between visiting art lovers (mind-bending contemporary art is right next door at Mass MoCA!) and the local crowd. Plus, there’s pizza. 2. South Western Massachusetts – Great Barrington If you find yourself in the southern stretch of the Berkshires, get a taste of the Appalachian Trail in , which has miles of hiking and multiuse trails. Walking on the Appalachian is generally an out-and-back that can be as long or as short as you like, but the forest’s most popular option is the gorgeous Benedict Pond Loop Trail, an easy hike that wraps 1.5 miles around a tree-fringed lake. After, swing by for their serious list of beers, plus a sprawling menu of sandwiches, salads, burgers, and more. Head straight through the dining room for the bar, where regulars’ mugs hang overhead and every possible surface is covered in coasters from breweries around the world. The tap list changes with the season, but the Black Bear Stout and Barrington Brown are local favorites. 3. Central Vermont – Woodstock & Vicinity Seven miles east of Woodstock, Quechee Gorge Trail is a pleasant 2.2-mile round-trip hike that starts at the visitors center and leads into Vermont’s deepest gorge, which was carved by retreating glaciers. On a hot day, it’s a lovely place to take a dip in the water. Follow up this short trail with a can from , which is about a half an hour drive away. Long Trail started filling kegs in 1989, and its flagship amber ale is now ubiquitous in Vermont. If that’s the only Long Trail brew you’ve tried, you’ll be astounded by the selection at the brewery, which keeps around 13 beers on tap. Standouts include the barrel-aged Triple Bag, but the bartenders are through-and-through beer geeks who can guide your selection. The brewery also has a menu of pub food featuring wings, burgers, and other beer-friendly meals. A raised walkway overlooks the bottling and brewing facility, giving you a fascinating bird’s-eye view of the action. 4. Northwest Vermont – Stowe Though it has a reputation for being a ski town, there’s plenty of hiking (and drinking!) options in Stowe. One of the best is the steep, 1.1-mile hike from Smuggler’s Notch Road to , a scenic body of water that dazzles in autumn. Once there, take the additional 1.4-mile loop around the pond, and then head back into town to treat yourself. Stowe is blessed with a wealth of locally-made craft beers, starting with the Austrian lagers at . Favorites include the malty Vienna Style Lager and the Helles Lager, and the Bierhall’s menu of Austrian pub food—think cheddar and beer soup, hot soft pretzels, and many kinds of sausages—are perfect pairings for the entire lineup. In contrast, the beers at are defined by their distinctiveness. The brewer is consistently creative, with seasonal specials along with a list of mainstays: Try the Pink ‘n’ Pale, an American pale ale brewed with a hint of bitter grapefruit. 5. Northwest Vermont – Burlington Just south of Burlington in Charlotte you’ll find , whose namesake low-lying peak offers incredible views of Lake Champlain, the Adirondacks, and more. Starting at the parking lot, the 1.9-mile Mount Philo Trail loops up to the summit. It’s a relatively easy, family-friendly hike with a huge payoff at the top. Back in Burlington, you’re not likely to run out of craft beer options—after all, Vermont has more breweries per capita than any other state! If all the choices make you think you’d like a tour guide (and chauffeur), you can hop on the bus with , which will take you to all the hotspots. has something for most beer lovers, starting with the flagship Conehead, a single hop wheat IPA that’s brewed with Citra hops and is aromatic and hoppy without being overpowering. Another favorite is the London Calling, an English ordinary bitter that’s malty and mellow—and not particularly bitter. makes European-style beers in a nondescript industrial building. The tasting room has more charm and is lined with old beer cans and historical images of Burlington. Try the hugely popular Yorkshire Porter, an English dark ale that’s rich and full bodied, or Argument, an English India pale ale that’s brewed true to style: strong and bitter. , a relatively recent addition to Burlington’s beer scene, has hoppy, aromatic beers made by passionate beer geeks. 6. Northwest New Hampshire – White Mountains & Franconia Range For the ultimate hike in the Franconia Range, plan for at least six hours on the , a rugged trail that goes up and over three peaks: Little Haystack Mountain, Mount Lincoln, and Mount Lafayette. You’ll climb 3,480 feet in about four miles, passing waterfalls, knife-edge ridges, and other scenic views. (Pro tip: for a slightly more moderate hike, try the instead.) Afterwards, it’s about a 15-minute drive north to the , which brews small-barrel batches of European-style beers that range from more familiar Hefeweizens to offbeat pours, like a sour brown wild ale, Leipzig-style gose, and Czech black lagers. If you’re feeling famished after the trek, take a seat in the historic riverside barn or kick back on the patio with one of their Neapolitan-style pizzas. 7. Southern Maine – Portland If urban “hikes” are more your thing, check out in Portland. Back Cove is a 3.6-mile paved trail that circles a small estuary just north of downtown. If you’re headed from north to south, the trail connects to the Eastern Promenade, a slender waterfront park that 2.1 miles end-to-end, with walking trails, a popular swimming beach, and jaw-dropping sunrise views. Check out for more maps and directions to some of the city’s best offerings. Afterwards, explore the cutting edge of American beer with a cluster of breweries that are walking distance from downtown. (The is also an option.) Don’t miss , which has a diverse list of beers on tap, including the flagship Daymark American Pale Ale, a gorgeously balanced brew made with locally grown rye. Devoted beer geeks should head next door to , which uses many local ingredients in its offerings, including whiskey, rum, gin, and the unusual Black Cap Barley Spirit, made entirely with Maine-grown barley and filtered through Maine maple charcoal. started in Kennebunkport, but the heart of Maine’s largest brewery is just on the edge of downtown Portland. The tasting room has a brewpub feel, with barrels of aging beers stacked high against the walls, and a huge selection of brews on draft. Finally, stop for a tasting at , which turns out beers beloved across New England, like the refreshing Allagash White and a rich-tasting tripel that packs a malty wallop.

Find more trails and ales to inspire your next #brewhike:

[hbg-title isbn="9781640491748" summary="Explore the best of New England’s historic cities, admire the famed fall foliage, and stroll the stunning coastline with Moon Travel Guides."/] Pin it for Later new england breweries and hikes pinterest graphic

to Gweneth Feynman

Added: 18.06.2019 18:24 | 5 views | 0 comments


Richard P. Feynman to Gweneth Feynman, October 11, 1961 October 11, 1961 Hotel Amigo, Brussels Hello, my sweetheart, Murray and I kept each other awake arguing until we could stand it no longer. We woke up over Greenland which was even better than last time because we went right over part of it. In London we met other physicists and came to Brussels together. One of them was worried—in his guidebook the Hotel Amigo was not even mentioned. Another had a newer guide—five stars! and rumored to be the best hotel in Europe! It is very nice indeed. All the furniture is dark red polished wood, in perfect condition; the bathroom is grand, etc. It is really too bad you didn't come to this conference instead of the other one. At the meeting next day things started slowly. I was to talk in the afternoon. That is what I did, but I didn't really have enough time. We had to stop at 4 PM because of a reception scheduled for that night. I think my talk was OK tho—what I left out was in the written version anyway. So that evening we went to the palace to meet the king and queen. Taxis waited for us at the hotel—long black ones—and off we went at 5 PM, arriving through the palace gates with a guard on each side, and driving under an arch where men in red coats and white stockings with a black band and gold tassel under each knee opened the doors. More guards at the entrance, in the hallway, along the stairs, and up into a ballroom, sort of. These guards stand very straight, dark grey Russian-type hats with a chin strap, dark coats, white pants, and shiny black leather boots, each holding a sword straight up. In the "ballroom" we had to wait perhaps 20 minutes. It has inlaid parquet floors, and L in each square (Leopold—the present king's name is Baudoin, or something). The gilded walls are 18th century and on the ceiling are pictures of naked women riding chariots among the clouds or something. Lots of mirrors and gilded chairs with red cushions around the outside edge of the room—just like so many of the palaces we have seen, but this time it was alive, no museum, everything clean and shining and in perfect condition. Several palace officials were milling around among us. One had a list and told me where to stand but I didn't do it right and was out of place later. The doors at the end of the hall open—guards are there, and the king and queen so we all enter slowly and are introduced one by one to the king and queen. The king has a young semi-dopey face and a strong handshake, the queen is very pretty. (I think her name is Fabriola—a Spanish countess she was.) We exit into another room on the left where there are lots of chairs arranged like in a theatre, with two in front, also facing forward, for K & Q later, and a table at the front with six seats is for illustrious scientists (Niels Bohr, J. Perrin (a Frenchman), J. R. Oppenheimer etc.). It turns out the king wants to know what we are doing, so the old boys give a set of six dull lectures—all very solemn—no jokes. I had great difficulty sitting in my seat because I had a very stiff and uncomfortable back from sleeping on the plane. That done, the K & Q pass thru the room where we met them and into a room on right (marked R). All these rooms are very big, gilded, Victorian, fancy, etc. In R are many kinds of uniforms, guards at door, red coats, white coat sort of waiters to serve drinks and hors d'oeuvres, military khaki and medals, black coat—undertaker's type (palace officials). On the way out of L into R, I am last because I walk slowly from stiff back and find myself talking to a palace official—nice man—teaches math part time at Louvain University, but his main job is secretary to the queen. He had also tutored K when K was young and has been in palace work 23 years. At least I have somebody to talk to, some others are talking to K or to Q; everybody standing up. After a while the professor who is head of conference (Prof. Bragg) grabs me and says K wants to talk to me. I pull boner #1 by wanting to shake hands again when Bragg says, "K, this is Feynman"; apparently wrong—no hand reaches up, but after an embarrassed pause K saves day by shaking my hand. K makes polite remarks on how smart we all must be and how hard it must be to think. I answer, making jokes (having been instructed to do so by Bragg, but what does he know?)—apparently error #2. Anyway, strain is relieved when Bragg brings over some other professor—Heisenberg, I think. K forgets F and F slinks off to resume conversation with Sec'y of Q. After considerable time—several orange juices and many very very good hors d'oeuvres later—a military uniform with medals comes over to me and says, "Talk to the queen!" Nothing I should like to do better (pretty girl, but don't worry, she's married). F arrives at scene: Q is sitting at table surrounded by three other occupied chairs—no room for F. There are several low coughs, slight confusion, etc. and lo! one of the chairs has been reluctantly vacated. Other two chairs contain one lady and one Priest in Full Regalia (who is also a physicist) named LeMaître. We have quite a conversation (I listen, but hear no low coughs, and am not evacuated from seat) for perhaps 15 minutes. Sample: Q: "It must be very hard work thinking about those difficult problems." F: "No, we all do it for the fun of it." Q: "It must be hard to learn to change all your ideas" (a thing she got from the six lectures). F: "No, all those guys who gave you those lectures are old fogeys—all that stuff was in 1926, when I was only eight, so when I learned physics I only had to learn the new ideas. Big problem now is, will we have to change them again?" Q: "You must feel good, working for peace like that." F: "No, never enters my head, whether it is for peace or otherwise we don't know." Q: "Things certainly change fast—many things have changed in the last hundred years." F: "Not in this palace." (I thought it, but controlled myself.) F: "Yes," and then launched into lecture on what was known in 1861 and what we found out since—adding at end, laughingly, "Can't help giving a lecture, I guess—I'm a professor, you see. Ha, ha." Q in desperation, turns to lady on her other side and begins pleasant conversation with same. After a few moments K comes over, whispers something to Q who stands up and they quietly go out. F returns to Sec'y of Q who personally escorts him out of palace past guards, etc. I'm so terribly sorry you missed it. I don't know when we'll find another king for you to meet. I was paged in the hotel this morning just before leaving with the others. Phone call—I returned to the others and announced, "Gentlemen, that call was from the queen's secretary." All are awestruck, for it did not go unnoticed that F talked longer and harder to Q than seemed proper. I didn't tell them, however, that it was about a meeting we arranged—he was inviting me to his home to meet his wife and two (of four) of his daughters, and see his house. I had invited him to visit us in Pasadena when he came to America and this was his response. His wife and daughters are very nice and his house was positively beautiful. You would have enjoyed that even more than visiting the palace. He planned and built his house in a Belgian style, somewhat after an old farmhouse style, but done just right. He has many old cabinets and tables inside, right beside newer stuff, very well combined. It is much easier for them to find antiques in Belgium than for you in Los Angeles as there are so many old farms, etc. He has large grounds and a vegetable garden—and a dog—from Washington—somebody gave the king and the K gave to him. The dog has a personality somewhat like Kiwi because I think he is equally loved. He even has a bench in his garden hidden under trees that he made for himself to go and sit on and look at the surrounding countryside. The house is slightly bigger than ours and the grounds are much bigger but not yet landscaped. I told him I had a queen in a little castle in Pasadena I would like him to see—and he said he hoped he would be able to come to America and see us. He would come if the Q ever visits America again. I am enclosing a picture of his house, and his card so I don't lose it. I know you must feel terrible being left out this time—but I'll make it up someday somehow. Don't forget I love you very much and am proud of my family that is and my family that is to be. The secretary and his wife send their best wishes to you and our future. I wish you were here, or next best thing, that I were there. Kiss SNORK and tell Mom all my adventures and I will be home sooner than you think. Your husband loves you. Your husband.

This Is Why You Should Always Wear Your Seatbelt When Flying

Added: 18.06.2019 17:30 | 4 views | 0 comments


There's always a risk of turbulence when you fly. As our resident pilot has written, it's more common in certain conditions, but whenever you're seated on a flight, you should...

Tags: Rita Ora, Seat
From: https:

Seattle Mariners fan tries to catch Tom Murphy home run

Added: 18.06.2019 17:11 | 17 views | 0 comments

A Seattle Mariners fan tries to catch a Tom Murphy home run by throwing his jacket in the air.

Tags: Seat
From: www.bbc.co.uk

Trump to officially kick off his reelection bid Tuesday night in Orlando

Added: 18.06.2019 14:17 | 13 views | 0 comments

Supporters are expected to pack a 20,000-seat arena, and the campaign has set up “an outdoor festival area” with live bands before the event.

From: https:

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