Tuesday, 28 March 2017
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www.theguardian.com: Cyclone Debbie: eye of storm makes landfall in north Queensland – live updates

Added: 28.03.2017 3:46 | 2 views | 0 comments


The eye of one of Australia’s worst storms in years hits the mainland between Bowen and Airlie Beach moving south-west at 12km/h


From AAP:
Residents in the path of Cyclone Debbie could be waiting until Wednesday for emergency help, as the destructive slow-moving storm keeps the region in lockdown for hours.
Northern region SES manager Dale Camp said strong winds are expected to continue into the evening.
The high-level category four system is not expected to weaken to a tropical low until midday on Wednesday.
“It’s a very slow-moving cyclone, so we’re talking anywhere between six and 14 hours until it’s completely over in each location,” he said.
“So that puts it well into this evening, and that’s the problem, everyone is going to have to stay in their house all day, and then stay there all night as well.
Mr Camp said poor light in the evening will hamper any clean-up efforts.
“We have to wait for that wind to die down before we move around, and if it’s at night time it makes it very difficult to see things like floodwaters, so they’ll probably be waiting until first light tomorrow,” he said.
Debbie had moved as slow as 4km/h in heading to the north Queensland coast on Tuesday morning but quickened to 12km/h as the eyewall made landfall near Airlie Beach just after midday.
Whitsundays councillor John Collins said Cyclone Debbie was one of the slowest he had experienced.
“I’ve been through a few cyclones that are quick and nasty but this one is going to go all day,” he said.
“It’s a long wait, sitting here waiting while it tears everything up.
“This is going to be a terrible disaster when it is all over and done with.”


Here is the latest tracking map from the Bureau of Meteorology. Debbie has just made landfall between Airlie Beach and Bowen as a category four cyclone.

is crossing the coast between and . Stay updated at


If you have taken video or photos of Cyclone Debbie, please send them through to helen.davidson@theguardian.com. We would love to run them on the site.
This request is only if you are able to do so safely. Please don’t take any risks.


The eye of cyclone Debbie has now reached mainland Queensland, making landfall between Bowen and Airlie Beach.
It’s estimated to be 50km east south-east of Bowen and 30km north-east of Proserpine. It has picked up speed slightly but remains very slow, moving south-west at 12km/h.

URGENT: starting to make landfall btwn Bowen & Airlie Beach. If winds stop, you are only in Eye. DO NOT GO OUTSIDE.


Operators of the Kinchant Dam at Mackay have begun releasing water after the heavy rains brought by the cyclone sent it beyond capacity overnight.
Colin Bendall, executive general manager of operations and services at SunWater, this was a routine action in response to a full dam, and they began releasing water about 11.30pm Monday.


As of half an hour ago, Cyclone Debbie remained a category four storm, sitting about 35km north-west of Hamilton Island and 65km east of Bowen. It’s moving at a very slow 9km/h.
At the centre of the cyclone the BoM has recorded sustained winds of 185km/h with gusts to 260km/h.

impacting Airlie Beach this morning. Conditions will intensify as the system moves closer. Stay inside. Stay safe.


Hello, this is Helen Davidson, taking over the live coverage of Cyclone Debbie for the next few hours.
I’ll get a summary of the current situation up shortly, as the storm moves ever so slowly over the Queensland coast.

Hope everyone in Queensland stays safe & sound. Just for once I'll say "c'mon Queenslander !" One of the most beautiful places on the planet


Whitsunday regional councillor, Mike Brunker, who is based in Bowen, said there was “huge concern” around the ability of the town’s older buildings to withstand the cyclone’s onslaught.
The last time Bowen, population 10,000, was rebuilt after a major cyclone was in 1958, when it was “wiped nearly off the map”, Brunker said.


I’m handing over our coverage to reporter Helen Davidson, who will continue to monitor Cyclone Debbie as it continues its slow crawl toward the north Queensland coast.


Wind gusts have , as the eye wall of Cyclone Debbie continues to move slowly through the Whitsundays.
This footage from Instagram user Tarin Moloney gives a sense of what it’s like for those on the island right now. Moloney said the pressure from the wind was making her ears pop.


Queensland Health has activated emergency operation centres and says hospitals remain open, despite the loss of power, including in Townsville and Mackay.

update
- Hospitals remain open incl. &
- Health Emergency Operations Centres have been activated.


The Queensland Fire and Emergency Services deputy commissioner, Mark Roche, said he had not yet received reports of widespread structural devastation. But he said his staff will not go outside until the winds reduce to at least 80km/h.
“We are seeing some of the footage coming from areas like Hamilton Island. A lot of wind, a lot of rain,” he told the ABC.


Yachts moored off of Airlie Beach are already being pushed around by Cyclone Debbie, well before the most destructive winds are forecast. Channel 7 has just posted this footage of a yacht being pushed into the breakwater.

Amazing footage of a yacht slamming into the breakwater wall at Airlie Beach, QLD


Police staffing triple-zero calls have told of increasingly panicked calls for help, according to AAP.
One caller said the roof was lifting off an apartment building in the Whitsunday region. Another caller from the region is sheltering in the laundry of a home whose roof has caved in.

The Bureau of Meteorology has just confirmed on radio the landfall time of is likely to be around 2pm.


Powerlines are reportedly down in Mackay and police are pleading with residents to stay inside. Thousands of homes remain without power in the town.

Power line across the road at Pollock Street in North Mackay

Mackay police are urging to STAY SHELTERED. Fallen powerlines are a hazard, many still LIVE. Please stay off the roads


Debris is flying through the air in Airlie Beach. AAP photographer, Dan Peled, said the power is also out.
“We just had a branch fly into our window,” Peled said from his room at a local hotel.
“We’ve got howling winds, torrential rain. The trees are sideways. There’s lots of vegetation debris and there’s a bit of water in the hallway. We’re just looking at a wall of white with the trees, we can’t see much. It’s full on.”

Palm trees getting a good workout in from


Large waves are being recorded across the north Queensland coast. Waves of up to eight metres were recorded by buoys off Mackay overnight. WeatherZone said that had only happened three times in the site’s history.

at is getting a thrashing - with sea foam being thrown around the banks.


Australian Red Cross volunteers are supporting residents at shelters in Bowen and Townsville. The Red Cross is also working with the Queensland government to support those affected by the cyclone and has launched its Register.Find.Reunite service, which will help connect friends and family during and after the cyclone. State director, Leisa Bourne, said:
“We’re asking everyone in cyclone-affected areas to do three important things: stay safe, let people know where you are, and look out for your neighbours.”

: fairly sleepless night in Bowen Shelter where volunteers Vaurian and Danielle are looking after 270 folks sleeping on the floor

We’re supporting 148 ppl in Bowen Cyclone Shelter and 21 in Townsville Cyclone Shelter right now as residents seek safety from


The James Cook University’s cyclone testing station is seeking to learn from Cyclone Bettie.
The centre’s director, David Henderson, said his staff had placed wind measurement devices on homes up and down the coast, to test how the buildings cope with long-lasting, turbulent conditions.

Daniel McMahon sent in this pic of the view at Hamilton Island


Tony Fontes is a dive tourism operator in Airlie Beach who lives about 500m from the ocean “but you can’t see it”.
“It’s a whiteout. You can’t see much, just a lot of rain.”


Vision continues to emerge from Hamilton Island, which is being hit by wind gusts of more than 200km/h. Visitors to the popular tourist destination largely get around on golf buggies. This video, from Twitter user Elisa Clements, shows a buggy flipped by the destructive winds.

Golf buggy down +200km wind


Almost 400 schools and childcare centres in north Queensland have been closed.
The state government said 131 state schools, 49 Catholic and independent schools, and 211 early childhood centres have shut their doors from north of Townsville to south of Proserpine.


I mentioned early that Hamilton Island had experienced wind gusts of 222km/h. Let’s put that in perspective. Hamilton Island has not experienced winds that strong for 15 years, according to Fairfax’s WeatherZone.

Hamilton Island's wind gust of 222km/h at 8:12am is their strongest in at least 15 years


There is further information to hand about power outages along the coast. Ergon Energy says that 23,000 homes are now without power, mostly in Mackay and the Whitsundays. More homes will lose power as the cyclone makes landfall.
Ergon Energy’s communications manager, John Fowler, said power would not be restored today. He said it was difficult to estimate when power may return.

8:35 am. Picking up... slowly. Winds strong but not destructive yet in . 986 mb & finally dropping!


The worst of the cyclone is still being felt in the Whitsundays.
Twitter user @sfdansmith captured this extraordinary footage from his room in the Reef View Hotel on Hamilton Island.

In the feeder bands


Mackay and other areas south of the cyclone are now in low tide. But the cyclone will see a storm tide of 1.5m above normal levels. That will create problems over the next few hours, when the cyclone makes landfall and the high tide returns.
The Bureau of Meteorology’s Adam Morgan said the tide was a significant risk to the safety of residents.

from increasing at and . Dangerous stormtide possible, crossing near high tide. Source: DSITI


Listen to the screeching winds audible in this video from Hamilton Island. The record winds of 180km/h and gusts of 222km/h on Hamilton.

Hour 5 and winds STILL picking up on Hamilton Island as crawls to coast, building shaking windows smashing


Whitsunday regional council mayor, Andrew Wilcox, is reporting horizontal, torrential rain outside his home. He said 11,000 homes in his region were without power.
Wilcox told the ABC that people should not venture outside, and that “there is nowhere to go anyway”.

Category 4 moving WSW towards the coast. Crossing expected after midday. Latest warnings:


There are reports of power outages already affecting the coast. reports power lost to thousands of homes in Mackay, Airlie Beach, Bowen, and other nearby areas.
Minor flooding has also begun in Mackay.

Low level flooding just starting in . Ducks are happy.


Journalists covering the approach of Cyclone Debbie have been criticised for ignoring warnings to stay inside.
Whitsunday Shire councillor, Mike Brunker, says television journalists covering Cyclone Debbie should “pull their heads in” and stay indoors for safety’s sake.

Nine reporter unable to give opinions of locals as everyone's inside.Take a hint dude and get out of it

TV reporter standing outside: "Stay indoors".


This morning’s first satellite images of Cyclone Debbie are beginning to emerge from Japan’s Himawari series of satellites.
The images are being updated every 10 minutes, and , or, for better quality, .

First visible images from of as the sun rises over eastern .


The says the eye wall of Cyclone Debbie is beginning to impact on parts of the Whitsunday Islands. The cyclone is inching towards the coast at a slow 6km/h, the bureau said. It is currently 85km east-northeast of Bowen and 60km north of Hamilton Island, and is forecast to make landfall between Ayr and Midge Point about midday. Incredibly, 194mm of rainfall has been recorded at Strathdickie, near Proserpine, in one hour.
Wind gusts of 200km/h have been recorded at Hamilton Island airport.

MACKAY: There have been 8 metre waves recorded off local beaches due to the serious weather system.


Queensland’s police commissioner, Ian Stewart, is warning the worst of Cyclone Debbie is yet to come. Stewart said the cyclone is moving very slowly, and its destructive core is still to pass over the coast. He also warned residents to prepare for a long day inside.
“The main core area of the cyclone - so that’s the area with the very, very high and destructive winds - really has not passed generally over the coast,” Stewart told the ABC.


Bureau of Meteorology forecaster, Adam Morgan, has urged residents in the cyclone’s path to stay inside. He said in Hamilton Island, peak wind gusts of 189km/h have been recorded. Incredibly strong winds of more than 100km/h have been recorded continuously since 9pm Monday.

: Powerful winds at Hamilton Island. Cyclone Debbie forecast to make landfall around 1pm.


The force of the winds in Mackay is already causing damage. The record winds of 65km/h, and gusts of up to 89km/h. That’s still far below what’s forecast for Cyclone Debbie.

Tree down just outside the ABC Mackay building! Lucky we all moved our cars!


The impact of Cyclone Debbie is currently being felt most on the Whitsundays, the popular holiday islands off the north Queensland coast. Queensland deputy police commissioner, Steve Gollschewski, said he had received reports of roof damage at police facilities in the Whitsundays region.
“We’re getting some reports already of roofs starting to lift, including at some of our own facilities in the Whitsundays,” he told the ABC.

Extremely windy here on - our balcony on the first floor is covered in sand. No major damage apparent yet.


The latest rainfall figures on the Bureau of Meteorology site are pretty astonishing. 89.2mm has fallen since 9am on Monday. 76.8mm of rain during the same time, and .

Rain in Bowen, sound is deafening. expected to hit at noon or 1pm


Mackay’s mayor, Greg Williamson, has attempted to clarify confusion over whether cyclone evacuation centres in the town are open. Williamson said evacuation centres will open only after the cyclone has passed. He said authorities do not want residents on the road while the cyclone is still active.
Williamson used a colourful turn of phrase to describe the night in Mackay.

Red Zone in South Mackay. Wind is starting to roar.


Vision of turbulent winds and rain in tourist hotspot Airlie Beach has begun to emerge.

WATCH: This is Main Street on Airlie beach. They are currently being battered by huge winds due to Cyclone


While many in Queensland are doing everything they can to get out of Debbie’s path, others are rushing towards it.
Josh Morgerman is an American cyclone chaser who came to Queensland to experience the category four storm. Morgerman is currently in Bowen, where the destructive core of the storm is due to hit. He has described conditions at 6.30am local time as “turbulent but nothing too crazy yet”.

6:30 am. Daybreak in . lurking just offshore. 988.3 mb.


The latest radar image from the Bureau of Meteorology’s Bowen radar shows the extent of rainfall expected between Mackay in the south and Townsville further north. In some areas, 33cm of rain is expected to fall on Tuesday. The deputy prime minister, Barnaby Joyce, gave us a sense of the scale of the expected rainfall.
“That is absolutely astronomical,” Joyce told ABC radio.

as seen on the radar. The loop clearly shows convective bands pushing onto the coast.


Far North Queensland sees more than its fair share of tropical cyclones. So how are homes in the region built to withstand destructive winds? James Cook University’s cyclone testing station research director, John Ginger, said homes built since the mid-1980s, under improved building standards, would be able to withstand Debbie.
“Houses built in the cyclonic regions of Queensland to improved building standards since the mid-1980s can be expected to withstand wind-loads forecast in TC Debbie,” Ginger said.


The that engine problems with two of the Navy’s largest ships – the amphibious assault ships HMAS Canberra and HMAS Adelaide – have rendered them unable to assist in the Cyclone Debbie response. Labor has described that as “very, very troubling”. The deputy prime minister, Barnaby Joyce, has just told ABC radio that another vessel, HMAS Choules, has been deployed instead and will arrive in the region in time.
“That’s how you manage things, if one isn’t available you send the other one,” Joyce said.


Queensland premier, Annastacia Palaszczuk, has just appeared on ABC to urge residents to stay safe, and prepare for a long day. She warned residents against being lulled into a false sense of security when the eye of the storm passes over.
“People will see some daylight and think that the worst of the storm has passed. Once again, I must urge everyone to stay indoors for most of today,” Palaszczuk said.


Many residents in the cyclone’s path have chosen to stay. Emergency services are advising them to bunker down, keep in contact, and be prepared for the loss of power.
If the winds die down, residents are urged not to go outside. It may just be a brief lull in the storm.


This is the view of Cyclone Debbie from space as it bears down on north Queensland.


Cyclone Debbie is the worst tropical cyclone seen in Queensland since Cyclone Yasi in 2011. Yasi was a category five tropical cyclone, which wiped out almost $1bn worth of crops and agriculture, destroyed yachts at Port Hinchinbrook, and caused the death of a man who was asphyxiated by fumes while sheltering inside with his generator.
This picture serves as a reminder of the force of Cyclone Yasi, which tossed yachts about at the Hinchinbrook Marina in early 2011.


Speaking of Mackay, 25,000 residents were urged to evacuate from the town’s low-lying areas on Monday. It is unclear how many residents followed that advice. Gollschewski said that would “become more clear this morning as we are able to connect with our people up there”. A big concern in Mackay is the coming storm tide, which is expected to flood low-lying areas. The Bureau of Meteorology is warning that the storm tide is increasing at Laguna Quays and Mackay.

from increasing at and . Dangerous stormtide possible, crossing near high tide. Source: DSITI


Queensland Police deputy commissioner, Steve Gollschewski, said emergency services were now focussing their attention on the Bowen-Whitsunday area. He said the region had been entirely locked down. Requests for help in the area could no longer be responded to, he said.
“People have to be inside. Our officers and emergency services have withdrawn. They cannot respond any that area,” Gollschewski told the ABC.


The latest report from AAP suggests the cyclone will make landfall near Bowen about 1pm, later than originally expected. Debbie has apparently slowed as it moves toward the coast, reducing the risk from the expected storm surge. AAP reporter, Shae McDonald, is at the popular backpacker destination, Airlie Beach. She reported the wind continued to increase throughout Monday night, making it difficult for many residents to sleep. The town and surrounding regions lost power at different points overnight, and alarms at the hotel were set off, only to be drowned out by the wind.


The gathering storm clouds made for a beautiful, ominous sunset in the town of Ayr last night.


Cyclone Debbie, predicted to be the most destructive storm in Australia for six years, is due to cross the Queensland coast near Ayr on Tuesday morning. Follow all the developments with our live coverage throughout the day.


By 5am local time, Cyclone Debbie had already begun to impact on the Whitsunday Islands. Destructive wind gusts of more than 120km/h were hitting the region, and the Bureau of Meteorology predicts the winds will extend further to the coast and islands between Ayr and Sarina throughout the morning. Damaging winds were hitting the popular holiday destination, Hamilton Island. There have been cancellations to flights to and from the island, and the local school has been closed today. The BOM’s latest advice is that the cyclone is moving west-southwest at nine kilometres per hour.

Severe , category 4, is approaching the Whitsunday Islands. Winds increasing at , now 94km/h.


Cyclone Debbie has been upgraded to a category four tropical cyclone, and is continuing to hurtle towards the far north Queensland coast. The latest information from the Bureau of Meteorology suggests its destructive core will make landfall between Ayr and Midge Point in the late morning. The cyclone is expected to bring wind gusts of up to 260km/h near its centre. Residents are being warned of a dangerous storm tide, which will continue to steadily rise as the cyclone approaches. The tide will bring damaging waves, strong currents and the flooding of low-lying areas.
Please stay safe out there. If it is safe to do so, let us know how your area is affected. Send us pictures or describe your experience in an email to christopher.knaus@guardian.co.uk. We’ll continue to bring you updates as the situation develops.

loop coinciding with wind visualisation from . Satellite images:

www.theguardian.com: Cyclone Debbie: category four storm due to hit Queensland coast – live updates

Added: 28.03.2017 1:16 | 3 views | 0 comments


Residents between Townsville and Mackay prepare for destructive winds and potential flooding from what may be one of Australia’s worst cyclones in years


Debris is flying through the air in Airlie Beach. AAP photographer, Dan Peled, said the power is also out.
“We just had a branch fly into our window,” Peled said from his room at a local hotel.
“We’ve got howling winds, torrential rain. The trees are sideways. There’s lots of vegetation debris and there’s a bit of water in the hallway. We’re just looking at a wall of white with the trees, we can’t see much. It’s full on.”

Palm trees getting a good workout in from


Large waves are being recorded across the far north Queensland coast. Waves of up to eight metres were recorded by buoys off Mackay overnight. WeatherZone said that had only happened three times in the site’s history.

at is getting a thrashing - with sea foam being thrown around the banks.


Australian Red Cross volunteers are supporting residents at shelters in Bowen and Townsville. The Red Cross is also working with the Queensland government to support those affected by the cyclone and has launched its Register.Find.Reunite service, which will help connect friends and family during and after the cyclone. State director, Leisa Bourne, said:
“We’re asking everyone in cyclone-affected areas to do three important things: stay safe, let people know where you are, and look out for your neighbours.”

: fairly sleepless night in Bowen Shelter where volunteers Vaurian and Danielle are looking after 270 folks sleeping on the floor

We’re supporting 148 ppl in Bowen Cyclone Shelter and 21 in Townsville Cyclone Shelter right now as residents seek safety from


The James Cook University’s cyclone testing station is seeking to learn from Cyclone Bettie.
The centre’s director, David Henderson, said his staff had placed wind measurement devices on homes up and down the coast, to test how the buildings cope with long-lasting, turbulent conditions.

Daniel McMahon sent in this pic of the view at Hamilton Island


Tony Fontes is a dive tourism operator in Airlie Beach who lives about 500m from the ocean “but you can’t see it”.
“It’s a whiteout. You can’t see much, just a lot of rain.”


Vision continues to emerge from Hamilton Island, which is being hit by wind gusts of more than 200km/h. Visitors to the popular tourist destination largely get around on golf buggies. This video, from Twitter user Elisa Clements, shows a buggy flipped by the destructive winds.

Golf buggy down +200km wind


Almost 400 schools and childcare centres in far north Queensland have been closed.
The state government said 131 state schools, 49 Catholic and independent schools, and 211 early childhood centres have shut their doors from north of Townsville to south of Proserpine.


I mentioned early that Hamilton Island had experienced wind gusts of 222km/h. Let’s put that in perspective. Hamilton Island has not experienced winds that strong for 15 years, according to Fairfax’s WeatherZone.

Hamilton Island's wind gust of 222km/h at 8:12am is their strongest in at least 15 years


There is further information to hand about power outages along the coast. Ergon Energy says that 23,000 homes are now without power, mostly in Mackay and the Whitsundays. More homes will lose power as the cyclone makes landfall.
Ergon Energy’s communications manager, John Fowler, said power would not be restored today. He said it was difficult to estimate when power may return.

8:35 am. Picking up... slowly. Winds strong but not destructive yet in . 986 mb & finally dropping!


The worst of the cyclone is still being felt in the Whitsundays.
Twitter user @sfdansmith captured this extraordinary footage from his room in the Reef View Hotel on Hamilton Island.

In the feeder bands


Mackay and other areas south of the cyclone are now in low tide. But the cyclone will see a storm tide of 1.5m above normal levels. That will create problems over the next few hours, when the cyclone makes landfall and the high tide returns.
The Bureau of Meteorology’s Adam Morgan said the tide was a significant risk to the safety of residents.

from increasing at and . Dangerous stormtide possible, crossing near high tide. Source: DSITI


Listen to the screeching winds audible in this video from Hamilton Island. The record winds of 180km/h and gusts of 222km/h on Hamilton.

Hour 5 and winds STILL picking up on Hamilton Island as crawls to coast, building shaking windows smashing


Whitsunday regional council mayor, Andrew Wilcox, is reporting horizontal, torrential rain outside his home. He said 11,000 homes in his region were without power.
Wilcox told the ABC that people should not venture outside, and that “there is nowhere to go anyway”.

Category 4 moving WSW towards the coast. Crossing expected after midday. Latest warnings:


There are reports of power outages already affecting the coast. reports power lost to thousands of homes in Mackay, Airlie Beach, Bowen, and other nearby areas.
Minor flooding has also begun in Mackay.

Low level flooding just starting in . Ducks are happy.


Journalists covering the approach of Cyclone Debbie have been criticised for ignoring warnings to stay inside.
Whitsunday Shire councillor, Mike Brunker, says television journalists covering Cyclone Debbie should “pull their heads in” and stay indoors for safety’s sake.

Nine reporter unable to give opinions of locals as everyone's inside.Take a hint dude and get out of it

TV reporter standing outside: "Stay indoors".


This morning’s first satellite images of Cyclone Debbie are beginning to emerge from Japan’s Himawari series of satellites.
The images are being updated every 10 minutes, and , or, for better quality, .

First visible images from of as the sun rises over eastern .


The says the eye wall of Cyclone Debbie is beginning to impact on parts of the Whitsunday Islands. The cyclone is inching towards the coast at a slow 6km/h, the bureau said. It is currently 85km east-northeast of Bowen and 60km north of Hamilton Island, and is forecast to make landfall between Ayr and Midge Point about midday. Incredibly, 194mm of rainfall has been recorded at Strathdickie, near Proserpine, in one hour.
Wind gusts of 200km/h have been recorded at Hamilton Island airport.

MACKAY: There have been 8 metre waves recorded off local beaches due to the serious weather system.


Queensland’s police commissioner, Ian Stewart, is warning the worst of Cyclone Debbie is yet to come. Stewart said the cyclone is moving very slowly, and its destructive core is still to pass over the coast. He also warned residents to prepare for a long day inside.
“The main core area of the cyclone - so that’s the area with the very, very high and destructive winds - really has not passed generally over the coast,” Stewart told the ABC.


Bureau of Meteorology forecaster, Adam Morgan, has urged residents in the cyclone’s path to stay inside. He said in Hamilton Island, peak wind gusts of 189km/h have been recorded. Incredibly strong winds of more than 100km/h have been recorded continuously since 9pm Monday.

: Powerful winds at Hamilton Island. Cyclone Debbie forecast to make landfall around 1pm.


The force of the winds in Mackay is already causing damage. The record winds of 65km/h, and gusts of up to 89km/h. That’s still far below what’s forecast for Cyclone Debbie.

Tree down just outside the ABC Mackay building! Lucky we all moved our cars!


The impact of Cyclone Debbie is currently being felt most on the Whitsundays, the popular holiday islands off the north Queensland coast. Queensland deputy police commissioner, Steve Gollschewski, said he had received reports of roof damage at police facilities in the Whitsundays region.
“We’re getting some reports already of roofs starting to lift, including at some of our own facilities in the Whitsundays,” he told the ABC.

Extremely windy here on - our balcony on the first floor is covered in sand. No major damage apparent yet.


The latest rainfall figures on the Bureau of Meteorology site are pretty astonishing. 89.2mm has fallen since 9am on Monday. 76.8mm of rain during the same time, and .

Rain in Bowen, sound is deafening. expected to hit at noon or 1pm


Mackay’s mayor, Greg Williamson, has attempted to clarify confusion over whether cyclone evacuation centres in the town are open. Williamson said evacuation centres will open only after the cyclone has passed. He said authorities do not want residents on the road while the cyclone is still active.
Williamson used a colourful turn of phrase to describe the night in Mackay.

Red Zone in South Mackay. Wind is starting to roar.


Vision of turbulent winds and rain in tourist hotspot Airlie Beach has begun to emerge.

WATCH: This is Main Street on Airlie beach. They are currently being battered by huge winds due to Cyclone


While many in Far North Queensland are doing everything they can to get out of Debbie’s path, others are rushing towards it.
Josh Morgerman is an American cyclone chaser who came to Queensland to experience the category four storm. Morgerman is currently in Bowen, where the destructive core of the storm is due to hit. He has described conditions at 6.30am local time as “turbulent but nothing too crazy yet”.

6:30 am. Daybreak in . lurking just offshore. 988.3 mb.


The latest radar image from the Bureau of Meteorology’s Bowen radar shows the extent of rainfall expected between Mackay in the south and Townsville further north. In some areas, 33cm of rain is expected to fall on Tuesday. The deputy prime minister, Barnaby Joyce, gave us a sense of the scale of the expected rainfall.
“That is absolutely astronomical,” Joyce told ABC radio.

as seen on the radar. The loop clearly shows convective bands pushing onto the coast.


Far North Queensland sees more than its fair share of tropical cyclones. So how are homes in the region built to withstand destructive winds? James Cook University’s cyclone testing station research director, John Ginger, said homes built since the mid-1980s, under improved building standards, would be able to withstand Debbie.
“Houses built in the cyclonic regions of Queensland to improved building standards since the mid-1980s can be expected to withstand wind-loads forecast in TC Debbie,” Ginger said.


The that engine problems with two of the Navy’s largest ships – the amphibious assault ships HMAS Canberra and HMAS Adelaide – have rendered them unable to assist in the Cyclone Debbie response. Labor has described that as “very, very troubling”. The deputy prime minister, Barnaby Joyce, has just told ABC radio that another vessel, HMAS Choules, has been deployed instead and will arrive in the region in time.
“That’s how you manage things, if one isn’t available you send the other one,” Joyce said.


Queensland premier, Annastacia Palaszczuk, has just appeared on ABC to urge residents to stay safe, and prepare for a long day. She warned residents against being lulled into a false sense of security when the eye of the storm passes over.
“People will see some daylight and think that the worst of the storm has passed. Once again, I must urge everyone to stay indoors for most of today,” Palaszczuk said.


Many residents in the cyclone’s path have chosen to stay. Emergency services are advising them to bunker down, keep in contact, and be prepared for the loss of power.
If the winds die down, residents are urged not to go outside. It may just be a brief lull in the storm.


This is the view of Cyclone Debbie from space as it bears down on Far North Queensland.


Cyclone Debbie is the worst tropical cyclone seen in Queensland since Cyclone Yasi in 2011. Yasi was a category five tropical cyclone, which wiped out almost $1bn worth of crops and agriculture, destroyed yachts at Port Hinchinbrook, and caused the death of a man who was asphyxiated by fumes while sheltering inside with his generator.
This picture serves as a reminder of the force of Cyclone Yasi, which tossed yachts about at the Hinchinbrook Marina in early 2011.


Speaking of Mackay, 25,000 residents were urged to evacuate from the town’s low-lying areas on Monday. It is unclear how many residents followed that advice. Gollschewski said that would “become more clear this morning as we are able to connect with our people up there”. A big concern in Mackay is the coming storm tide, which is expected to flood low-lying areas. The Bureau of Meteorology is warning that the storm tide is increasing at Laguna Quays and Mackay.

from increasing at and . Dangerous stormtide possible, crossing near high tide. Source: DSITI


Queensland Police deputy commissioner, Steve Gollschewski, said emergency services were now focussing their attention on the Bowen-Whitsunday area. He said the region had been entirely locked down. Requests for help in the area could no longer be responded to, he said.
“People have to be inside. Our officers and emergency services have withdrawn. They cannot respond any that area,” Gollschewski told the ABC.


The latest report from AAP suggests the cyclone will make landfall near Bowen about 1pm, later than originally expected. Debbie has apparently slowed as it moves toward the coast, reducing the risk from the expected storm surge. AAP reporter, Shae McDonald, is at the popular backpacker destination, Airlie Beach. She reported the wind continued to increase throughout Monday night, making it difficult for many residents to sleep. The town and surrounding regions lost power at different points overnight, and alarms at the hotel were set off, only to be drowned out by the wind.


The gathering storm clouds made for a beautiful, ominous sunset in the town of Ayr last night.


Cyclone Debbie, predicted to be the most destructive storm in Australia for six years, is due to cross the Queensland coast near Ayr on Tuesday morning. Follow all the developments with our live coverage throughout the day.


By 5am local time, Cyclone Debbie had already begun to impact on the Whitsunday Islands. Destructive wind gusts of more than 120km/h were hitting the region, and the Bureau of Meteorology predicts the winds will extend further to the coast and islands between Ayr and Sarina throughout the morning. Damaging winds were hitting the popular holiday destination, Hamilton Island. There have been cancellations to flights to and from the island, and the local school has been closed today. The BOM’s latest advice is that the cyclone is moving west-southwest at nine kilometres per hour.

Severe , category 4, is approaching the Whitsunday Islands. Winds increasing at , now 94km/h.


Cyclone Debbie has been upgraded to a category four tropical cyclone, and is continuing to hurtle towards the far north Queensland coast. The latest information from the Bureau of Meteorology suggests its destructive core will make landfall between Ayr and Midge Point in the late morning. The cyclone is expected to bring wind gusts of up to 260km/h near its centre. Residents are being warned of a dangerous storm tide, which will continue to steadily rise as the cyclone approaches. The tide will bring damaging waves, strong currents and the flooding of low-lying areas.
Please stay safe out there. If it is safe to do so, let us know how your area is affected. Send us pictures or describe your experience in an email to christopher.knaus@guardian.co.uk. We’ll continue to bring you updates as the situation develops.

loop coinciding with wind visualisation from . Satellite images:

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In “Amy: A Life Through the Lens,” two photographer brothers claim that certain paps were hired by her father to keep her safe.

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From: www.music-news.com

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Added: 27.03.2017 5:31 | 2 views | 0 comments


Opponents of Donald Trump's failed healthcare bill got a big, meme-filled laugh yesterday. But fans of both basketball and the Affordable Care Act? Well, they got perhaps the biggest laugh of all. According to a report from Deadspin, a PAC called American Action Network purchased a series of ads thanking several Republican members of Congress for "keeping [their] promise" to repeal and replace Obamacare.  Of course, this didn't happen: As of Friday, Obamacare is alive and kicking, and the Republicans are facing the bitter sting of defeat. SEE ALSO: The White House doesn't want to call it Trumpcare, so Stephen Colbert's going to call it Trumpcare But some of the ads aired anyway, many of them during March Madness coverage. Oops! They've also been on YouTube since March 14, which seems a little, uh, preemptive? In the immortal words of New Jersey senator Bob Menendez, "Don't worry, that burn is covered under the Affordable Care Act." WATCH: Trump never has to buy sunglasses again because Obama's photographer will shade him forever

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Added: 27.03.2017 5:00 | 2 views | 0 comments

Photographs of the young girls banned from attending school

From: www.bbc.co.uk

Pete Souza joins chorus gloating over Trumpcare failure with epic Instagram

Added: 25.03.2017 19:30 | 3 views | 0 comments


The schadenfreude online when Trumpcare collapsed for a second time was deafening. However, amid all the resurfaced Trump tweets and Art of the Deal jokes one troll stood out once again. Pete Souza, Obama's official White House photographer, added another Instagram post to his mammoth shade collection against Trump after the news broke Friday. SEE ALSO: Obama's official White House photographer is Insta-trolling Trump This time, Souza shared a photo of Obama and Mike Pence from 2010 — and the caption was devastating. "Before voting on the Affordable Care Act in 2010, President Obama met with many members of Congress on both side of the aisle over the course of many months," he wrote. "This picture was taken at the end of a multiple hours-long meeting with the entire Republican House caucus in which he responded to dozens of questions and critiques. It was carried live on cable TV." In other words, Obama knew that healthcare was — you know — complicated, and worked hard with Republicans and Democrats, in the glare of the media, to get the ACA pushed through. An approach that differs, you may say, from Trump's efforts this week. Before voting on the Affordable Care Act in 2010, President Obama met with many members of Congress on both sides of the aisle over the course of many months. This picture was taken at the end of a multiple hours-long meeting with the entire Republican House caucus in which he responded to dozens of questions and critiques. It was carried live on cable TV. A post shared by Pete Souza (@petesouza) on Mar 24, 2017 at 1:40pm PDT Of course, Souza's lesson to Trump is a bit late now. WATCH: Trump never has to buy sunglasses again because Obama's photographer will shade him forever

"Tennessee Titans My First Team" Board Book for $3 + free shipping

Added: 25.03.2017 19:17 | 1 views | 0 comments

Nordstrom offers the Tennessee Titans 101 My First Team Board Book for $2.98 with free shipping. That's the lowest price we could find by $9. This baby's guide to the Titans features a board for autographs plus a photograph slot.

From: dealnews.com

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