Sunday, 26 February 2017
News with tag Networks  RSS
Preferential trade agreements enhance global trade at the expense of its resilience

Added: 26.02.2017 2:07 | 0 views | 0 comments

The global commodity trade is a complex system where its network structure, which may arise from bilateral and multilateral agreements, affects its growth and resilience. At time of economic shocks, redundancy in this system is vital to the resilience of growth.

From: https:

Artificial synapse for neural networks

Added: 25.02.2017 21:03 | 3 views | 0 comments

A new organic artificial synapse could support computers that better recreate the way the human brain processes information. It could also lead to improvements in brain-machine technologies.

Tags: EU, Networks, Mac
From: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Onkyo 7.2 WiFi Receiver, $200 Newegg GC for $599 + free shipping

Added: 25.02.2017 18:24 | 0 views | 0 comments

Electronics Expo via Newegg offers the Onkyo 7.2-Channel WiFi Bluetooth Network A/V Receiver, model no. TX-NR757, bundled with a $200 Newegg Gift Card for $599 with free shipping. (The gift card will be automatically added to your cart.) Assuming you'll use the gift card, that's the lowest total price we could find by $200. This THX Select2 Plus certified receiver features a 384kHz/32-bit Asahi Kasei DAC, Dolby Atmos support, front-channel VLSC, 4K UHD and 3D pass-through, AM/FM radio, 10 HDMI ports (eight in, two out), USB, and Apple Airplay support.

From: dealnews.com

Understanding which wireless network is actually the best

Added: 25.02.2017 10:51 | 1 views | 0 comments


Every year, a bunch of different studies come out that crown a winner, the "best network" in the USA. Each study claims to use the best, most scientific methodology to give "unrivaled accuracy" or "undisputed results," or something else equally quotable.
But if the studies are so good, why do they give such different results? Take a study , which has Verizon in first place and T-Mobile in last. That's in stark contrast to a , which had T-Mobile and Verizon tied for first and Sprint languishing in last place.
The reason for the difference is that measuring cellphone networks is hard. We're talking about trying to quantify a network that stretches across the entire country, works on tens of thousands of different devices and in all kinds of terrain. Trying to measure that, assign each of the big four wireless networks an easy-to-understand score and publish results in a 300-word blog post is basically impossible.

RootMetrics and OpenSignal are two good examples of the most common approach to actually measuring network signal and speed (as opposed to something like Nielsen, which surveys users for their perception of their network). RootMetrics buys devices and sends testers out to set locations, where they test all the networks head-to-head and record the results.
It's known in the industry as drive-testing, and has some major advantages: it pits the networks head-to-head, it's repeatable, and by controlling the number of tests, the location, and the testing device, you remove most of the variability in the testing.
OpenSignal takes a completely different approach. Rather than sending employees out with test devices, it encourages users to download an app. Users then conduct speed tests and coverage tests as they go about their day-to-day lives, and the data is uploaded to OpenSignal.
Compared to drive-testing, it's less repeatable and less "scientific." But it also has the advantage of sheer numbers: hundreds of thousands of OpenSignal users submitted billions of data points for their last test. That means OpenSignal is more likely to be representative of day-to-day performance of a network, as it's measuring the actual day-to-day performance of users -- not a statistical representation of the average day.
Yes, there are flaws in OpenSignal's methodology too. Users are more likely to be on a network that works in their area, so you're less likely to get data from areas that have no coverage. If a small town somewhere only gets Verizon signal, then everyone in that town is going to be on Verizon, and you're not going to get a bunch of tests that show no signal for T-Mobile.
There's also questions about demographics: wealthier people with nicer smartphones are more likely to be on expensive networks like Verizon and AT&T, which means more Sprint and T-Mobile users would be on older smartphones, which in turn are slower than newer devices on the same network.
The end result is that no one method is perfect, and it's important to look at a range of results rather than just one test. For the majority of users, I tend to suspect that crowd-sourced testing like OpenSignal will be more representative, but without seeing the precise data set and methodology of all the studies (for example, the RootScores that RootMetrics provides are calculated ) it's difficult to make a call one way or the other.
There is one thing that prospective customers can check, though: local coverage maps. Quantifying a cell network across a country is hard, but getting data on coverage on a particular street is comparatively easy. OpenSignal excels at this, thanks to the crowd-sourced data, and its coverage map should be the first thing you check when you're thinking about switching networks.

From: https:

Google’s Pixel XL works much better on Verizon than T-Mobile for one weird reason

Added: 25.02.2017 4:21 | 5 views | 0 comments


It's 2017, which means we're long past the days when your phone should lock you in to one particular carrier. Unfortunately, Google doesn't seem to agree.
A  Cellular Insights takes a deep dive into how the Google Pixel XL performs on different networks. According to their testing, 3x Carrier Aggregation -- a feature that combines different LTE bands for blazing-fast speeds -- doesn't work on T-Mobile, but does on Verizon.

The end result will be slower speeds for T-Mobile users compared to Verizon, even if the two networks are totally equal in one place. It's a handicap for T-Mobile, as most customers won't know that it's the phone causing the slowdown.
The reason for the lack of 3xCA on T-Mobile appears to be software related. 3xCA works just fine on Verizon, and Google advertises 3xCA as a feature for the Pixel XL. Cellular Insights explains the problem:
"Despite the device being fully unlocked and (at least initially) marketed in North America as Cat 9 capable, Google exercises the right to enable and disable not only LTE bands and CA combos on “per operator” basis, but capabilities and features as well, such as LTE Category and Higher Order Modulation. We simply can not rationalize the reason behind this decision, but it is hard to imagine that this was an accident, knowing that T-Mobile is one of the very first U.S. operators to rollout 3xCA, as well as one of the first operators globally to activate DL-256QAM, UL-64QAM, EVS, etc. We are hoping that one of the upcoming Google OTA updates will take care of T-Mobile specific carrier profile, allowing the Pixel XL to take the full advantage of the network."
With your tinfoil hat on, there's one obvious explanation for this behaviour: Verizon is the exclusive carrier retail partner for the Pixel and Pixel XL in the States. If you want a Pixel on T-Mobile, you'll have to buy it outright unlocked from Google and get your own T-Mobile SIM. Hypothetically, there might be some agreement between Verizon and Google to only enable certain network features on Verizon, giving the network a sly upper hand.
Google did not immediately return a request for comment.

From: https:

'Fargo' Season 3 Release Date, Plot FX Reveals Synopsis; Series to Premiere in April

Added: 24.02.2017 23:51 | 2 views | 0 comments

Reports have it that the FX cable network has already set the date for the crime drama anthology's upcoming premiere and it will air on Wednesday, April 19, at 10 p.m. ET.

Tags: Networks, PC
From: www.christianpost.com

News outlets excluded from White House press secretary's gaggle

Added: 24.02.2017 23:10 | 4 views | 0 comments

Multiple news outlets were excluded from a White House gaggle with press secretary Sean Spicer Friday afternoon, according to reporters present, sparking criticism from the White House Correspondents' Association and other observers. The move comes amid President Donald Trump's ongoing battle with many news organizations, which he has characterized as "fake news" and the "enemy of the American People," an assertion which he doubled down on today during the Conservative Political Action Conference. The gaggle, which took place in Spicer's office, was being held in lieu of a traditional briefing in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room, which seats 49 reporters but is often filled with others who line the sides and back of the room. The outlets invited to join Spicer today included the Washington Times, One America News Network and Breitbart News, as well as television networks including ABC, CBS, Fox News and NBC, Reuters, the Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg, among others. The...

Neural networks promise sharpest ever images

Added: 24.02.2017 20:10 | 16 views | 0 comments

Telescopes, the workhorse instruments of astronomy, are limited by the size of the mirror or lens they use. Using 'neural nets', a form of artificial intelligence, a group of Swiss researchers now have a way to push past that limit, offering scientists the prospect of the sharpest ever images in optical astronomy.

From: https:

The Walking Dead ‘Will Have a Long Life,’ AMC Predicts

Added: 24.02.2017 19:24 | 0 views | 0 comments


Like a zombie horde, the cable network thinks there's little that can stop the march of the hit drama.

From: www.cbr.com

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